A quick field test of the Irix 11mm – Me and Irix

A single shot of The Dolomites Mountain Range from the top shot with the Irix 11mm f/4
A single shot of The Dolomites Mountain Range from the top shot with the Irix 11mm f/4

As previously stated, Courtesy of IRIX I’ve been granted of an Irix 11mm f/4 lens to review and test during my travels and photo sessions.
To thank them for the opportunity I’ve decided to add a little series of articles called “Me and IRIX” (#MeAndIrix), where I will share tips and tricks that I’ll discover day by day. I hope that will help you to get the most from the Lens.

Usually I post a single photo each day on my Social Networks, but here I want to show you the first results, I’ll try to upload the most large images I can, in order to let you check the quality when 100% zoomed.

For obvious reasons I cant post the full quality images, but I will post some 100% zoomed details. Like these:

100% Center detail
100% Center detail
100% Crop of center
100% Crop of center
100% crop of mid right
100% crop of mid right
100% Crop Low Left
100% Crop Low Left
100% Crop of Low Center
100% Crop of Low Center
100% Crop Mid side
100% Crop Mid side

As you can see, if you can spot the places, the sharpness of tiny details is impressive

So, how is the Lens?

To answer to the first questions I’ve got via Instagram and Facebook, I can say that the overall lens performance is outstanding.

Said that I shoot with two 36Mp Nikon DSLRs (a D800 and a D810), the image quality obtained is absolutely incredible for a so extreme focal length (11mm not fisheye).

The only two tangible evidences that can be found are a little amount of distortion on the sides (and I challenge anyone to not finding it in a 11mm lens), and some very limited fringing.

This last one, mainly visible on the the high contrasted borders, for example those where the line of the mountains meet the sky. But both of them can be easily corrected via a couple of clicks with Lightroom or Camera Raw.

As first hint I can share is that the fringing phenomenon can be heavily reduced if the lens is stopped to f/8 till f/11, at the same aperture the lens reaches its maximum sharpness.

Basically I guess that’s the sweet spot of the lens, and when one is doing landscape photography, f/8 is quite a good aperture to shoot.

The lens perform great even for night photography, here you can se a photo of the Milky Way obtained with the combination of 25 shots at high ISO. So, to complete the post, here are two of the first samples I’ve took on the field, more will follow really soon.

Continue to follow me to see more, leave a comment or question, and if you like, subscribe to my blog or on my “socials” for more news and photos!

The Milky Way in all its magnificence in a dark summer night Shot with the Irix 11mm f/4
The Milky Way in all its magnificence in a dark summer night Shot with the Irix 11mm f/4
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